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English – Features of Diary Writing

This article will explain all the features of Diary Writing in English. Meant for KS2 – KS3 students.

We know that there are numerous features involved when making a diary writing entry. Therefore, I’ll only be covering the major features that you should NEVER miss out on.

The first feature is to try not to indent paragraphs. Some people just indent subconciously and that’s why this is one of the most overlooked features in a diary writing entry. This HAS to be there because in reality diary writing entries and informal and when you have a diary writing it’s meant for yourself so there is no need to indent it.

Secondly, it should be composed of chatty, informal language. Instead of using things like ‘therefore’ and ‘although’ you should aim for less sophisticated connectives/terms such as ‘and then’ or ‘gotta go’. This is perhaps one of the features that will get you more marks so it is vital that this is in there. It never hurts to include your own comments (after all, since it’s a diary writing, it’s technically supposed to be you writing for yourself) such as ‘Ow! I needed an aspirin really bad!’ or something along those lines.

Thirdly, you need to make sure that your entry is in chronological order and is written in first person. After all, it’s you talking about yourself so you should be talking in first person rather than second or third. Each diary entry has to have a date included on top of it too. Of course, you probably knew this already but it’s still vital. Also remember that since your diary writing is an account of past events that have already ocurred, you need to write in past tense. You also need to express your own opinions and expressions, describing how you truly felt. One mistake that you need to avoid is making your diary entry end up as a list of events that ocurred in your day.

In conclusion, these are the main and most vital points that you should follow in order to produce a good work of diary writing. The basic things such as grammar, punctuation, etc. I have left out because it really shouldn’t be necessary to review such basic points. Anyways, I hope that this article has helped you increase the value and quality of your works in the future. Thank you and have a good day.

For more informative and helpful articles, check out my Triond profile or my Expertscolumn profile at http://expertscolumn.com/users/thatteenagewriter

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6 Responses to “English – Features of Diary Writing”
  • hatem
    October 12th, 2012 at 10:49 am

    hello stupid sexie boy

  • ThatTeenageWriter
    October 26th, 2012 at 4:56 am

    Not sure how to respond to that… hello random twat?

  • sophie
    November 21st, 2012 at 8:15 am

    lol

  • Asma
    December 28th, 2012 at 8:11 am

    Hi,

    I have to write a funny diary in the style of ‘Diary of a Nobody’ but I don’t know how to write comedy! Do you have any tips?

  • ThatTeenageWriter
    December 28th, 2012 at 4:40 pm

    Hey Asma,

    If you’re unsure on how to do a piece of writing that’s supposed to mimic the style of another, I usually find it best to pick out a chapter or two and thoroughly analyse it. When I analyse it, I look at how the author has structured it (do they use lots of variation in sentence structure or are they repetitive?) as well as the type of theme they’re trying to project which, in your case, is comedy.

    In a more comedic theme, you might try to comment on things as you talk about them. When you comment on these things, you could either talk about the brighter side of the situation or make fun of yourself for it. For example, a comment could be: “at least I didn’t trip over the wire” or to make fun of yourself you could say “I’m so clumsy I might as well have tripped over the wire!”. If you’re making up the events that are happening in entry, a good bet would be to talk about a series of comically unfortunate events that happen to you such as anvils falling out of the sky and so on. Try to get imaginative with it but don’t go overboard and at times, try to make an event something funny that people can relate to like searching for a cell phone only to find it in your hand.

    A last tip is that if you’re unsure of how to write something in your diary entry, open up the ‘Diary of a Nobody’ and analyse it. Example: if I’m unsure whether or not to indent paragraphs in a diary entry, I’d open one up and check out the paragraphs to see how it’s done.

    Hope this helps!

  • ThatTeenageWriter
    December 28th, 2012 at 4:41 pm

    Hey Asma,

    If you’re unsure on how to do a piece of writing that’s supposed to mimic the style of another, I usually find it best to pick out a chapter or two and thoroughly analyse it. When I analyse it, I look at how the author has structured it (do they use lots of variation in sentence structure or are they repetitive?) as well as the type of theme they’re trying to project which, in your case, is comedy.

    In a more comedic theme, you might try to comment on things as you talk about them. When you comment on these things, you could either talk about the brighter side of the situation or make fun of yourself for it. For example, a comment could be: “at least I didn’t trip over the wire” or to make fun of yourself you could say “I’m so clumsy I might as well have tripped over the wire!”. If you’re making up the events that are happening in entry, a good bet would be to talk about a series of comically unfortunate events that happen to you such as anvils falling out of the sky and so on. Try to get imaginative with it but don’t go overboard and at times, try to make an event something funny that people can relate to like searching for a cell phone only to find it in your hand.

    A last tip is that if you’re unsure of how to write something in your diary entry, open up the ‘Diary of a Nobody’ and analyse it. Example: if I’m unsure whether or not to indent paragraphs in a diary entry, I’d open one up and check out the paragraphs to see how it’s done.

    Hope this helps!

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