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Is Constant Content Worth Your Time?

After a few weeks on Associated Content, Constant Content, Demand Studios, and Suite101, I would like to share my initial experience of these sites with you. This is the second article in a series of four articles that closely examines each of these sites. This article takes a look at Constant Content.

a close up (mac) by notsogoodphotography.
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As the first article in this series described, I’m taking a little toe dabble into some other freelance sites to see what potential they have. This series of articles explores my initial impression of each of the sites.

Constant Content

Constant Content stockpiles articles from freelance writers and offers them to potential clients for purchase. Constant Content is appealing because you set the price you want to sell your articles for. Also, you can specify a different price for each of the rights (usage, unique, or full rights) you are willing to sell. Constant Content takes a cut of 35% of each sale.

I submitted my article Salt Lake City, Utah: A Tourist’s Delight to Constant Content several months ago. After about a month and a half, a client purchased it. This gave me a boost, and I decided to submit more content to Constant Content.

I’ve had a rough go with the other three articles I submitted, however.

One article was rejected because I forgot to change the font to Times New Roman. When articles are rejected, they are purged from the Constant Content system. This is a pain because work goes into submitting the articles in the format that Constant Content requires. To have this particular article reconsidered, I’d need to again go through the 15-minute-or-so submission process.

The next article was rejected due to spelling errors. There were no spelling errors. I ran spell check again. I’m thinking the Constant Content automated editor rejected the article because it thought the proper nouns in the article were spelling errors. Argh!

The third article I submitted has yet to be reviewed, though it has been nearly a week and a half since I submitted it.

There’s another aspect of Constant Content that I’m not crazy about: “public requests” from clients. Clients can put out requests to the writers at Constant Content to write articles on whatever topics they need. The clients specify what rights they need and how much they are willing to pay for each article. If you write one of these articles, however, the client is not obligated to buy it. If you are up for this game, I think the key is to write on one of the topics that is general enough that you could post your article on another site if the client does not purchase it.

Summing Up

I’m not very impressed with Constant Content so far. Much of the system seems to be automated. Articles that are not in strict accordance with the Constant Content rules are purged from the system. The article review process can also take quite a long time. Finally, writing an article for a public request is a gamble because the client can choose to accept or not accept this article that was tailored to their needs and written specifically for them.

What has your experience with Constant Content been like?

You might also like the other articles in this series:

Is Associated Content Worth Your Time?

Is Demand Studios Worth Your Time?

Is Suite101 Worth Your Time?


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42 Responses to “Is Constant Content Worth Your Time?”
  • Budding Polymath
    October 21st, 2009 at 8:06 am

    I’m a member of Constant Content, but I just haven’t had the energy to submit any writing to them, because the whole thing is a gamble. There are people who write for Constant Content who seem to sell a majority of the things they write. No matter what you post there should be something for someone, right?

    I also think it’s important for a freelance writing site to make sure that the articles its writers are submitting are above par.

    Thanks for the insight!

  • ashan1614
    October 21st, 2009 at 9:35 am

    The more I read from you, the more I just want to hang around Triond and take my chances here for the few dollars a month I earn.

  • Vikram Chhabra
    October 21st, 2009 at 11:27 am

    Freelancing has been something I have been considering for a while. Thanks for making us aware of the problems you are facing.

  • Celeste Stewart
    October 21st, 2009 at 12:42 pm

    I can tell you that Constant-Content is indeed worth it. The CC editor is real, and he’s tough. Spell checkers and grammar checkers aren’t good enough to rely on. If he says there was a spelling error, you can bet there was. Submitting one or two articles isn’t really a fair test of the site’s potential.

  • Lostash
    October 21st, 2009 at 4:23 pm

    I don’t think I’ll bother with this site then!!

  • Guy Hogan
    October 21st, 2009 at 8:07 pm

    The more I hear about other writing sites the more I’m convinced that I’ve made the right choice to put all my effort into Triond. A good article on Triond will earn for as long as Triond is on the Internet. Just think of the earning potential of 500 articles. The numbers don’t lie. I have 330 articles to go. One more year should do the trick.

  • DeborahLawwill
    October 22nd, 2009 at 8:57 am

    I haven’t actually tried constant content yet but I’ve been signed up. I think the trick with them is to write about popular or “hot” subjects. I save the “I wanna” writes for my blog. Unfortunately, that’s the industry.

  • Bonnie
    October 23rd, 2009 at 7:55 pm

    Just a point of clarification on Constant Content – the editor is an actual human being – there is no automation involved. Also I find it difficult to believe that the submission process took 15 minutes. I just uploaded three articles to CC in less than 10 minutes. I would suggest saving your articles as Word documents – that would make it easy to change formats/fonts, etc.

    I have been a member of Constant Content for more than four years, and I can definitely say it is worth the effort. There have been months my CC earning far exceeded those of my \”real\” job.

    Bonnie

  • WriteEditSeek
    October 23rd, 2009 at 10:07 pm

    Just a note in response to Celeste and Bonnie. If the editor is indeed “real,” I would appreciate his putting a little effort into explaining why articles are rejected. Right now, a form email with a one line reason is sent out.

    Update: My third article was rejected because the content was not original enough. No clue what that means.

    I’m giving up on Constant Content. It’s not worth my effort.

  • Celeste
    October 30th, 2009 at 9:59 pm

    The editor is real alright. If you really want the inside scoop, you need to explore the CC community. Ed often elaborates when asked about rejections and the community is extremely helpful. If the Bonnie in this thread is the Bonnie I think she is, she’s a top seller there. Constant-Content is not for everyone by any stretch, but for some of us, it’s an amazing and financially rewarding site.

    And yeah, it takes me all of about half a minute to upload a document, not fifteen minutes. Even for newbies, it’s not that difficult to fill out a few fields and click Submit. Granted, a first timer might want to take her time and read all the fine print, but once you know what you’re doing, it’s no more difficult than posting a comment right here.

  • Lisa
    November 6th, 2009 at 7:53 pm

    I recently joined CC, and so far it’s been a good experience. With my first submission, I proofread it several times for grammatical errors, typos, etc., but still I let a factual error through. The editor spotted the mistake immediately and my article was rejected. I then fixed that error and triple checked for any others before submitting again. This second time it was approved and sold immediately.

    I’m sure the CC editor receives dozens or article each day, and I don’t blame him for not devoting valuable editing time to pointing out each mistake in an article. Once he spots a mistake, I’m sure he stops reading and sends a rejection based strictly on that error. CC makes it very clear that authors are expected to thoroughly proofread and research their articles before submitting.

    Personally, I’m glad to find a writing site that truly emphasizes the quality of the content.

  • HayleyWriter
    November 26th, 2009 at 1:54 am

    I have been writing for Constant Content for over a year and it is now by best selling site for articles. I know it can be difficult for newcomers to grasp the submission guidelines, but if you make an effort, you can really succed on Constant Content. Quality is king and the customers pay top dollar for the articles. I make several hundred dollars a month and that’s only writing part-time for CC! I’ve just released an ebook “Sales Success on Constant Content”, so if you want tips and advice to make your venture into the CC waters easy, you can get all the help you need.

  • dianne
    January 24th, 2010 at 4:49 am

    I have just started on http://www.contentcurrent.com . It seems quite user-friendly, have a look. You bid on articles and have 3 days to submit, then get paid straight away.

  • M.
    February 8th, 2010 at 2:09 pm

    I recently joined constant content, and I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the results. I started off by writing 2 articles of about 500 words each. I optimized them for a couple of keywords and submitted them. One was returned because I had a spelling error in the article description, while the other was rejected because included less than 1/3rd of the article in the sample portion that buyers can look at. I made the changes and resubmitted, and both were accepted. About a week later, both articles had sold single use rights. I’ve since written 5 more and had several more sales, both in single use and full rights. All in all, I’d guess my hourly rate for these articles is about $40, though it may be too early to tell.

  • Anuradha Ramkumar
    April 6th, 2010 at 8:27 am

    I too am not very happy with constant content. As you said, they rejected two of my articles saying spelling errors, but I really couldn’t find any spelling errors.

  • Genesis
    April 6th, 2010 at 11:30 am

    I’ve been writing for Constant Content for a couple of years and while early on I had several articles rejected, I finally got the hang of it and went on to submit hundreds over time. What I love about the site is that you build up a catalog (I don’t bother with the public requests, too much competition) and it continues to sell. I haven’t submitted more than three or four articles in the past 6 months, but still pull in $50-100 a month from older articles selling.

    It is a gamble, since you don’t know for sure that you’re going to sell, but I’ve sold pretty consistently and most of my articles are between $30-50, with a few up to $100 (and several of those have sold!).

    As for the submissions, I’m not sure why it would take 15 minutes . . . it is a bit annoying, but still not more than a couple minutes tops. Constant is very strict on quality, but I see that as a good thing because those writers willing to work hard and write only the best will get paid well for it, since clients KNOW they are getting top quality.

  • andromida
    April 14th, 2010 at 3:26 am

    I was about to submit my articles in constant content.After reading your experience, I am giving a second thought to my plan.thank you.

  • AD
    April 19th, 2010 at 10:40 am

    I am a professional writer and I wrote a lot of articles which were appreciated by many. But my experience with constent content was very bad. I posted the article yesterday after reviewing. Today, I got the editorial note that my account is suspended due to grammatical errors. But, nowhere in the email they spotted any error.

  • John
    April 19th, 2010 at 5:11 pm

    I’m thinking of trying constant-content. The interesting thing I note is that almost every single post complaining that they were rejected because of unknown errors… has a spelling or grammar error in the post! Sorry, but if you can’t post without making errors, then I’m not surprised at the rejection by an editor.

  • AD
    April 20th, 2010 at 10:36 am

    To John

    It is good that you are going to try constant content. But you cannot conclude anyone\’s writing on the basis of posts. Because everyone is writing here casually. These post may have several typing errors as well. On the other hand when we write in flow, several times we make mistakes which are rectified at the time of revision (which is done by most of us in case of articles). Apart, if there are mistakes in the articles, then at least those should be spotted. However best of luck for your experience in constant content. I am also going to try again with my another ID. Let see what happens.

  • GameLinx
    May 4th, 2010 at 3:12 pm

    I wrote a game review there, and they banned me from their system. They said I wrote a plagiarist article. I wrote the article myself. It was my first article there, they have a 3 strikes rule, and banned be off after 1 strike. Whenever I complain there, they could give a care what I say. And they always only respond with one sentence explanations.

    They don’t really give you any explanations about why photos are rejected. Even if your content is original, they can reject it. I don’t like them.

  • Julie
    May 8th, 2010 at 11:04 am

    Thank you so much for these articles. I am new to all of this and have been trying to get my head around which sites would be best to submit work, so I’m grateful for your feedback on these sites.

  • Jeffery Bayliss
    June 5th, 2010 at 8:01 am

    Bottom line: Good for some, not good for others. Clear enough. But being that the pay is so good, it is certainly worth a try.

  • Lamonica
    August 18th, 2010 at 10:32 pm

    I have had a good experience with Constant Content. I have only submitted one article to the website and plan to add more. Before I joined Constant Content I had been writing for a similar website called Daily Article. You can submit your articles to Daily Article without waiting for it to be reviewed for grammar/spelling errors. So Daily Article might be a good website for some of you to try.

    I wrote about my experience with Constant Content and Daily Article on my blog. Here\’s the link: http://mimirosesjourney.blogspot.com/2010/08/my-personal-experience-with-constant.html

  • stickersrock
    September 7th, 2010 at 5:40 pm

    I have submitted a few articles with CC now, finally, and have been a member for a long time.

    I agree with everything said in this article.

    The most important impression I have so far is that this site sells fluffy volume. 500 words is about the average and the highest paying word count is at 5 cents a word. It drops off in every direction from there.

    They seem to cater to people looking for web content so that may explain the short article lengths. Unfortunately that results in a ton of articles that really don’t seem to say much.

    The other thing I noticed is that the biggest sellers sell maybe triple the # of full rights articles compared to usage and very few uniques. If you don’t want to give up your rights to the work, statistics would say that you’d lose most of your income.

  • Sinclair Summers
    October 6th, 2010 at 2:40 pm

    As an American, I don’t want to be associated with any entity that censors and suppresses free speech and communication such as Constant Content. They openly advertise that they review and reject any article they feel is editorial in style. Read between the lines my fellow Americans. We live in a Country where free speech and communication is our right. Don’t waste your time trying to conform your articles to the ways of the Constant Content dictator. Find another way and long live the USA!

  • Kit Sunde
    November 12th, 2010 at 5:50 am

    Dear Sinclair Summrs,

    The freedom of speech you are talking about doesn’t work like that. Private entities are free to publish whatever they feel. For example just because you can shout, doesn’t mean you can walk into CNN and demand 15 minutes of shouting time on the air. You also forget that hate speech, publishing national secrets and a whole bunch of other things are illegal and infringe on freedom of speech. George Carling also had something to say about freedom of speech in your country, when someone was actually on the air.

    Your sense of entitlement to freedom of speech is unfounded, as your country much as every other country doesn’t in fact grant you freedom of speech on the level you think it does.

  • Ask Cash
    November 17th, 2010 at 10:53 pm

    I became a member of constant content about a year ago, but just found their process too exhausting to submit any writing. Like you said the site is all automated and even the smallest error ends up in rejection.

  • geowb
    January 24th, 2011 at 7:24 pm

    No agent is worth 35%.
    20% MAYBE BUT 35%? NEVER,especially if they are atomated.

  • joyce carpenter
    July 15th, 2011 at 2:24 pm

    I tried Helium, Suite 101, Associated Content, and several others before finding Constant Content. Constant Content is the only site where you can make enough money on your articles to make it worth your while. The amount the other sites pay is laughable, and I really can’t see why anyone would bother. Having said that, you have to know English grammar, spelling, and usage inside out and upside down. If not, don’t bother.

    It’s the only site I would bother with if I were purchasing articles as well. Who wants to spend hours wading through badly written articles full of typos? I’d rather pay a little more and get what I want in a hurry.

    I love that you can write on anything you want. I tried applying to current contant, only to be given an assignment to write on something I don’t know anything about and couldn’t care less about. I’ll stick with Constant Content.

  • Ojo Oluwakemi
    July 30th, 2011 at 5:37 am

    Why is everyone is talking about Constant content, what happened to Helium. I have tried Triond, Constant content, Associated content, Suite101 but for me, the best of all is still Helium.
    On Helium, I have the opportunity to earn through writing contests, Assignment opportunities, choose any topic or article I can write on, submit my own topics and write on them. So far so good, I still earn from the articles I wrote four years ago. I earn money everyday on Helium. You have to be constant on Helium before you can earn a lot. You can’t only write two or three articles in a week and expect to earn more.

  • RebelW
    September 18th, 2011 at 1:22 pm

    Celeste, this: “The CC editor is real, and he’s tough.” IS BULL. We’re not school children and we’re not in the military. “Tough,” in this instance, is rude. “The CC editor is real, and he’s rude” sounds much more realistic, appropriate and true.

  • FreelancingMom
    October 11th, 2011 at 4:20 am

    I’ve had a few articles sell with Constant Content, and I’m seriously considering writing more to list for sale. The editor is tough, and he does come across as rude but I’m guessing that’s because he’s right to the point. That may be one of the biggest reasons why some writers only submit a few articles there, but with the changes going on in the content industry places like Constant Content may be one of the few sites where we can earn what we’re truly worth.

  • James Bowden
    November 12th, 2011 at 2:09 am

    Thanks fo sharing this excellent information in reference to suite 101. Currently I spend a great deal of my time writing for hubpages. I have heard nothing but good thins in reference to suite 101. I had been accepted to this online writing community over 2 months ago. And just recently to Constant=Content. The problem is I have not really submitted any articles to any of these sites, because I have mainly been publishing my work on hubpages. However, after reading your reviews, particularly that of suite 101, I will have to get busy and producing articles for them. thanks again for all of the great feedback.

    Jl

  • John
    December 26th, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    I have purchased a few articles from CC, and also had some articles written, I always get a quality article (sometimes two or three) that are far above my expectations, so many other sites allow such poor quality articles to be sold and then circulate the Internet, as a content buyer I couldn’t be happier with CC

  • Chris
    March 29th, 2012 at 1:19 pm

    I’ve been on CC for a while and I can say the site is a complete waste of time if you want to be a serious writer (like me). I’ll tell you why.

    1. Writing for CC earns you ZERO credibility in the writing community. In most cases you are selling full rights to the article, so you can’t include them in your portfolio of work (I’m fairly certain that full rights means you are completely giving up any claim to the article being yours). Also, because you have no contact with the client you have no idea where your work is going to end up, or even if you will get a byline in the article.

    2. The rates are terrible, just terrible. You get to set your own rates, sure, but most of the articles on there sell in the 5-10 cent a word range which is woefully low if you plan on making significant income from writing. Take away the 35% cut ( a massive cut off your sale) and you’re getting less than a nickel per word for your time in some cases. Yikes.

    3. There are no guarantees that your article will sell, even if you are writing in response to one of the public requests. Also, because you have no contact with the client you have no way of knowing what style and tone they are looking for so you’re just sort of hoping that the client will like what you’ve written. It’s just too much of a gamble.

    4. I’m sure the staff at CC are getting rich off this racket, and the poor writers get almost no power, no connections, and no cred in the situation.

    So if you do want to get into freelancing don’t waste your time with brokerage sites like CC or AC. It just isn’t worth it. You’d be better of starting out by getting articles published in local newspapers which doesn’t pay at all most likely, put you at least get some cred, a byline, connections, a writing sample, and most importantly your name gets out there.

    Anyways, that’s just my $0.02. I had to get that off my chest.

  • Anne Wicks (psued)
    May 7th, 2012 at 10:21 am

    geowb wrote:

    “No agent is worth 35%.
    20% MAYBE BUT 35%? NEVER,especially if they are atomated.”

    geowb, CC reviews/edits are neither “atomated” nor automated. :)

    - Yes, for 35% I expect CC reviewers to repair minor typos and send the articles through. But they don’t — such a waste of manpower.

    - Most CC writers build that 35% into their prices.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Chris.
    - On a $50 article we net $32.50. This is primarily web content, not rocket science, and the majority of us don’t care that it’s ghost writing. Where else can you earn $32.50 for 30 minutes of writing?

    Many of us also write for print, and have our typing fingers in several lucrative fires. For me, writing for CC isn’t about building a reputation. It’s about the earning potential. Those writers who weren’t frightened away by their first rejections, are writers with strong online reputations with or without CC.

    On another note, while I enjoy my CC earnings, I will never think of the “editors’ as editors until they actually physically edit. They are reviewers.

  • Jamshitty
    June 11th, 2012 at 10:12 am

    Wow, what a terrible article, you just made constant content look like shit when it’s not.

  • David
    September 1st, 2012 at 10:37 am

    If you consider constant content a waste of time or find it annoying, you probably:

    1) Don’t understand how to value your time and effort as a writer. You’d probably rather spend hours and hours writing to lower standards for far less money than your time is worth than to spend a couple well-planned hours working on one article that has the potential to showcase your skills and bring in decent payment.

    I’ll break down the math. On a content farm site like Triond, Associated Content, Helium, and many others, writers are primarily paid through some sort of adshare revenue. A decent article (say one that takes one hour to write) may earn next to nothing–at best, maybe a few bucks a month (let’s be generous and say $5). To reach a goal of $25 per month, you’d probably have to write AT LEAST four more articles that do as well as or better than the first (expect another 5 hours of time). In the end, you might make $25 in a month, but if you account for all the time you wasted being unproductive (an estimated 4-6 hours total, let’s say), your work in that month is devalued to a measly $4.16 to maybe $6.25 per hour. You’d do much better by finding a part-time job. On constant content, I wrote one article–on abdominal exercises. It maybe took an hour to write and ended up being about 800 words. I put that article for sale at $50 (my cut being $32.50). Even though it took a while for it to sell, it’s a popular topic (doing market research is crucial to making reliable sales) and when it did sell, I’d have earned for myself the equivalent of $32.50/hr. considering the little time I spent working. Which seems the better deal, waiting months or years to ever see a few bucks, writing at below-minimum wage equivalents, or earning well over $30/hr when your piece is bought? Just to put it in perspective, even a decent and popular article on a content farm would take roughly 10-11 MONTHS via adshareto earn the money I earned in less than one month in only one hour’s work.

    2) Don’t realize that you will spend years and years, wasting hundreds hours writing for low-standard content farms, before you could ever reach the potential earnings you could be getting from constant content.

    3) Are expecting people to just throw easy money at you for doing minimal work. Ghostwriting web content and writing SEO articles earns fairly decent money if you put in the work, work efficiently, and don’t quit if you don’t make a fortune the first day.

    4) Don’t realize that if you put months or years of experience writing for a content farm like Triond on a resume, any professional writer/writing company would laugh at you. They’d say something along the lines of, “Why on earth should I hire you? You spend hours and hours writing for pennies at low standards of writing, when you could be applying yourself, showcasing your skills, and be earning far better pay. Obviously YOU don’t have much respect for your time or your craft, so why should I respect them?”

    I’ve seen this happen. Triond, Associated Content, Helium, and the like are all resume-destroyers.

  • David
    September 1st, 2012 at 10:38 am

    If you consider constant content a waste of time or find it annoying, you probably:

    1) Don\’t understand how to value your time and effort as a writer. You\’d probably rather spend hours and hours writing to lower standards for far less money than your time is worth than to spend a couple well-planned hours working on one article that has the potential to showcase your skills and bring in decent payment.

    I\’ll break down the math. On a content farm site like Triond, Associated Content, Helium, and many others, writers are primarily paid through some sort of adshare revenue. A decent article (say one that takes one hour to write) may earn next to nothing–at best, maybe a few bucks a month (let\’s be generous and say $5). To reach a goal of $25 per month, you\’d probably have to write AT LEAST four more articles that do as well as or better than the first (expect another 5 hours of time). In the end, you might make $25 in a month, but if you account for all the time you wasted being unproductive (an estimated 4-6 hours total, let\’s say), your work in that month is devalued to a measly $4.16 to maybe $6.25 per hour. You\’d do much better by finding a part-time job. On constant content, I wrote one article–on abdominal exercises. It maybe took an hour to write and ended up being about 800 words. I put that article for sale at $50 (my cut being $32.50). Even though it took a while for it to sell, it\’s a popular topic (doing market research is crucial to making reliable sales) and when it did sell, I\’d have earned for myself the equivalent of $32.50/hr. considering the little time I spent working. Which seems the better deal, waiting months or years to ever see a few bucks, writing at below-minimum wage equivalents, or earning well over $30/hr when your piece is bought? Just to put it in perspective, even a decent and popular article on a content farm would take roughly 10-11 MONTHS via adshareto earn the money I earned in less than one month in only one hour\’s work.

    2) Don\’t realize that you will spend years and years, wasting hundreds hours writing for low-standard content farms, before you could ever reach the potential earnings you could be getting from constant content.

    3) Are expecting people to just throw easy money at you for doing minimal work. Ghostwriting web content and writing SEO articles earns fairly decent money if you put in the work, work efficiently, and don\’t quit if you don\’t make a fortune the first day.

    4) Don\’t realize that if you put months or years of experience writing for a content farm like Triond on a resume, any professional writer/writing company would laugh at you. They\’d say something along the lines of, \”Why on earth should I hire you? You spend hours and hours writing for pennies at low standards of writing, when you could be applying yourself, showcasing your skills, and be earning far better pay. Obviously YOU don\’t have much respect for your time or your craft, so why should I respect them?\”

    I\’ve seen this happen. Triond, Associated Content, Helium, and the like are all resume-destroyers.

  • David
    September 1st, 2012 at 10:40 am

    Why on earth does this comment site auto-insert slashes next to apostrophes and quotation marks?

  • Susan Wowe
    January 1st, 2013 at 2:47 pm

    Thanks for your post to help me gain more knowledge of constant content, I think I will make more comparisons.

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